Cryosauna Cryotherapy Helps Fight Pain and Promote Healing

 

Medical doctor uses before and after X-rays to show how Cryosauna cryotherapy treatments at Help For Health, 2800 Gallows Rd. Vienna VA, helped to speed up the healing of athlete’s leg injury.

Injury Recovery2

Pain Mgmt

 

 

 

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How Does Cryosauna Cryotherapy Fight Pain and Promote Healing

Imagine you are taking a shower… But instead of water you are surrounded by dry, cold air just for 2.5 to 3 minutes – too little to start freezing; enough to motivate the brain to mobilize and activate all regulatory functions. The immune system is stimulated, the released endorphins reduce pain sensitivity, enriched blood creates favorable conditions for internal organ regeneration, for expelling of toxins from subcu­taneous layers, for cell renewal, replacement of damaged cells and elimination of dead cells from peripheral tissues. Every organ is affected positively – self-healing of the human body occurs.

  • Inhibits inflammation

  • Reduces swelling

  • Eases chronic pain

  • Heals nerve damage

  • Speeds up post surgery and injury recovery

  • Improves skin conditions like psoriasis

  • Effectively treats stress, burn- out, insomnia, anxiety and depression

Recent Study Shows how Cryosauna Cryotherapy Helps Relieve Back Pain

The following study abstract, published in 2014, demonstrates how the Cryosauna cryotherapy can help relieve back pain:

Effect of frequent WBC treatments on the back pain therapy in elderly men.
Giemza C1, Matczak-Giemza M, De Nardi M, Ostrowska B, Czech P.

Faculty of Physiotherapy, University School of Physical Education , Wrocław , Poland .

Cryotherapy is the application of a stimulus of a cryotherapeutic temperature below -100 °C in a period of 1-3 min in order to stimulate and use physiological reactions of human body to cold. It can be applied to specific body parts or to a whole body. Whole-body cryotherapy is a treatment method applied in treatment of motor organ issues, nervous system diseases, psychiatry, dermatology and laryngology. The research group consisted of 80 male in the age range of 65-77 suffering from chronic, lasting more than 3 months, lower back pain. The subjects qualified to the research were divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 40 patients who participated in whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) twice a week. Group B also contained 40 patients who participated in WBC whole week. Examinations were conducted twice. The first one was conducted before the commencement of the treatment while the second one after the therapy was over. The results of the research did not show any statistically significant improvement in patients from Group A. However, the results obtained by Group B have proven significant condition improvement and enable the researchers to conclude that WBC is effective in treating patients with lower back pain.

From: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25133646

What Is Back Pain?

Back pain is an all-too-familiar problem that can range from a dull, constant ache to a sudden, Appointment Buttonsharp pain that leaves you incapacitated. It can come on suddenly—from an accident, a fall, or lifting something heavy—or it can develop slowly, perhaps as the result of age-related changes to the spine. Regardless of how back pain happens or how it feels, you know it when you have it. And chances are, if you don’t have back pain now, you will eventually.

How Common Is Back Pain?

In a 3-month period, about one-fourth of U.S. adults experience at least 1 day of back pain. It is one of our society’s most common medical problems.

What Are the Risk Factors for Back Pain?

Although anyone can have back pain, a number of factors increase your risk. They include:

Age: The first attack of low back pain typically occurs between the ages of 30 and 40. Back pain becomes more common with age.

Fitness level: Back pain is more common among people who are not physically fit. Weak back and abdominal muscles may not properly support the spine.

Side View of Spine
Normal Vertebra

People who go out and exercise a lot after being inactive all week are more likely to suffer painful back injuries than people who make moderate physical activity a daily habit. Studies show that low-impact aerobic exercise is good for the disks that cushion the vertebrae, the individual bones that make up the spine.

Diet: A diet high in calories and fat, combined with an inactive lifestyle, can lead to obesity, which can put stress on the back.

Heredity: Some causes of back pain, such as ankylosing spondylitis, a form of arthritis that affects the spine, have a genetic component.

Race: Race can be a factor in back problems. African American women, for example, are two to three times more likely than white women to develop spondylolisthesis, a condition in which a vertebra of the lower spine—also called the lumbar spine—slips out of place.

The presence of other diseases: Many diseases can cause or contribute to back pain. These include various forms of arthritis, such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and cancers elsewhere in the body that may spread to the spine.

Occupational risk factors: Having a job that requires heavy lifting, pushing, or pulling, particularly when this involves twisting or vibrating the spine, can lead to injury and back pain. An inactive job or a desk job may also lead to or contribute to pain, especially if you have poor posture or sit all day in an uncomfortable chair.

Cigarette smoking: Although smoking may not directly cause back pain, it increases your risk of developing low back pain and low back pain with sciatica. (Sciatica is back pain that radiates to the hip and/or leg due to pressure on a nerve.) Furthermore, smoking can slow healing, prolonging pain for people who have had back injuries, back surgery, or broken bones.

What Are the Causes of Back Pain?

It is important to understand that back pain is a symptom of a medical condition, not a diagnosis itself. Medical problems that can cause back pain include the following:

Mechanical problems: A mechanical problem is a problem with the way your spine moves or the way you feel when you move your spine in certain ways. Perhaps the most common mechanical cause of back pain is a condition called intervertebral disk degeneration, which simply means that the disks located between the vertebrae of the spine are breaking down with age. As they deteriorate, they lose their cushioning ability. This problem can lead to pain if the back is stressed. Other mechanical causes of back pain include spasms, muscle tension, and ruptured disks, which are also called herniated disks.

Injuries: Spine injuries such as sprains and fractures can cause either short-lived or chronic pain. Sprains are tears in the ligaments that support the spine, and they can occur from twisting or lifting improperly. Fractured vertebrae are often the result of osteoporosis. Less commonly, back pain may be caused by more severe injuries that result from accidents or falls.

Acquired conditions and diseases: Many medical problems can cause or contribute to back pain. They include scoliosis, a curvature of the spine that does not usually cause pain until middle age; spondylolisthesis; various forms of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis; and spinal stenosis, a narrowing of the spinal column that puts pressure on the spinal cord and nerves. Although osteoporosis itself is not painful, it can lead to painful fractures of the vertebrae. Other causes of back pain include pregnancy; kidney stones or infections; endometriosis, which is the buildup of uterine tissue in places outside the uterus; and fibromyalgia, a condition of widespread muscle pain and fatigue.

Infections and tumors: Although they are not common causes of back pain, infections can cause pain when they involve the vertebrae, a condition called osteomyelitis, or when they involve the disks that cushion the vertebrae, which is called diskitis. Tumors also are relatively rare causes of back pain. Occasionally, tumors begin in the back, but more often they appear in the back as a result of cancer that has spread from elsewhere in the body.

Although the causes of back pain are usually physical, emotional stress can play a role in how severe pain is and how long it lasts. Stress can affect the body in many ways, including causing back muscles to become tense and painful.

Can Back Pain Be Prevented?

One of the best things you can do to prevent back pain is to exercise regularly and keep your back muscles strong. Four specific types of exercises are described in the section “How Is Back Pain Treated?.” All may help you avoid injury and pain. Exercises that increase balance and strength can decrease your risk of falling and injuring your back or breaking bones. Exercises such as tai chi and yoga—or any weight-bearing exercise that challenges your balance—are good ones to try.

Eating a healthy diet also is important. For one thing, eating to maintain a healthy weight—or to lose weight, if you are overweight—helps you avoid putting unnecessary and injury-causing stress and strain on your back. To keep your spine strong, as with all bones, you need to get enough calcium and vitamin D every day. These nutrients help prevent osteoporosis, which is responsible for a lot of the bone fractures that lead to back pain. Calcium is found in dairy products; green, leafy vegetables; and fortified products, like orange juice. Your skin makes vitamin D when you are in the sun. If you are not outside much, you can obtain vitamin D from your diet: nearly all milk and some other foods are fortified with this nutrient. Most adults don’t get enough calcium and vitamin D, so talk to your doctor about how much you need per day, and consider taking a nutritional supplement or a multivitamin.

Practicing good posture, supporting your back properly, and avoiding heavy lifting when you can may all help you prevent injury. If you do lift something heavy, keep your back straight. Don’t bend over the item; instead, lift it by putting the stress on your legs and hips.

What Is Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis (AH-stee-oh-ar-THREYE-tis) is the most common type of arthritis and is seen especially among older people. Sometimes it is called degenerative joint disease. Osteoarthritis mostly affects cartilage (KAR-til-uj), the hard but slippery tissue that covers the ends of bones where they meet to form a joint. Healthy cartilage allows bones to glide over one another. It also absorbs energy from the shock of physical movement. In osteoarthritis, the surface layer of cartilage breaks and wears away. This allows bones under the cartilage to rub together, causing pain, swelling, and loss of motion of the joint. Over time, the joint may lose its normal shape. Also, small deposits of bone—called osteophytes or bone spurs—may grow on the edges of the joint. Bits of bone or cartilage can break off and float inside the joint space. This causes more pain and damage.

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People with osteoarthritis usually have joint pain and stiffness. Unlike some other forms of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis affects only joint function. It does not affect skin tissue, the lungs, the eyes, or the blood vessels.

In rheumatoid arthritis, another common form of arthritis, the immune system attacks the tissues of the joints, leading to pain, inflammation, and eventually joint damage and malformation. It typically begins at a younger age than osteoarthritis, causes swelling and redness in joints, and may make people feel sick, tired, and feverish. Also, the joint involvement of rheumatoid arthritis is symmetrical; that is, if one joint is affected, the same joint on the opposite side of the body is usually similarly affected. Osteoarthritis, on the other hand, can occur in a single joint or can affect a joint on one side of the body much more severely.

Who Has Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis is by far the most common type of arthritis, and the percentage of people who have it grows higher with age. An estimated 27 million Americans age 25 and older have osteoarthritis.1


1Lawrence RC, Felson DT, Helmick CG, Arnold LM, Choi H, Deyo RA, Gabriel S, Hirsch R, Hochberg MC, Hunder GG, Jordan JM, Katz JN, Kremers HM, Wolfe F. Estimates of the prevalence of arthritis and other rheumatic conditions in the United States: Part II. Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Jan;58(1):26-35.

Although osteoarthritis becomes more common with age, younger people can develop it, usually as the result of a joint injury, a joint malformation, or a genetic defect in joint cartilage. Both men and women have the disease. Before age 45, more men than women have osteoarthritis; after age 45, it is more common in women. It is also more likely to occur in people who are overweight and in those with jobs that stress particular joints.

How Does Osteoarthritis Affect People?

People with osteoarthritis usually experience joint pain and stiffness. The most commonly affected joints are those at the ends of the fingers (closest to the nail), thumbs, neck, lower back, knees, and hips.

Osteoarthritis affects different people differently. It may progress quickly, but for most people, joint damage develops gradually over years. In some people, osteoarthritis is relatively mild and interferes little with day-to-day life; in others, it causes significant pain and disability.

Although osteoarthritis is a disease of the joints, its effects are not just physical. In many people with osteoarthritis, lifestyle and finances also decline.

What Areas Does Osteoarthritis Affect?

Outline of a woman highlighting neck, spine, hips, fingers, and knees to show common locations of osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis most often occurs in the hands (at the ends of the fingers and thumbs), spine (neck and lower back), knees, and hips

Lifestyle effects include:

  • depression
  • anxiety
  • feelings of helplessness
  • limitations on daily activities
  • job limitations
  • difficulty participating in everyday personal and family joys and responsibilities.

Fortunately, most people with osteoarthritis live active, productive lives despite these limitations. They do so by using treatment strategies such as rest and exercise, pain relief medications, education, and support programs; learning self-care; and working to maintain a positive attitude.

Osteoarthritis Basics: The Joint and Its Parts

A joint is the point where two or more bones are connected. With a few exceptions (in the skull and pelvis, for example), joints are designed to allow movement between the bones and to absorb shock from movements like walking or repetitive motions. These movable joints are made up of the following parts:

Cartilage: A hard but slippery coating on the end of each bone. Cartilage, which breaks down and wears away in osteoarthritis, is described in more detail in “Cartilage: The Key to Healthy Joints.

Joint capsule: A tough membrane sac that encloses all the bones and other joint parts.

Synovium (sin-O-vee-um): A thin membrane inside the joint capsule that secretes synovial fluid.

Synovial fluid: A fluid that lubricates the joint and keeps the cartilage smooth and healthy.

Ligaments, tendons, and muscles: Tissues that surround the bones and joints, and allow the joints to bend and move. Ligaments are tough, cord-like tissues that connect one bone to another.

Tendons: Tough, fibrous cords that connect muscles to bones. Muscles are bundles of specialized cells that, when stimulated by nerves, either relax or contract to produce movement.

A Healthy Joint (Representation)

images of a healthy joint
In a healthy joint, the ends of bones are encased in smooth cartilage. Together, they are protected by a joint capsule lined with a synovial membrane that produces synovial fluid. The capsule and fluid protect the cartilage, muscles, and connective tissues.

A Joint With Severe Osteoarthritis (Representation)

images of a joint with osteoarthritis
With osteoarthritis, the cartilage becomes worn away. Spurs grow out from the edge of the bone, and synovial fluid increases. Altogether, the joint feels stiff and sore.

Cartilage: The Key to Healthy Joints

Cartilage is 65 to 80 percent water. The remaining three components—collagen, proteoglycans, and chondrocytes—are described below.

  • Collagen (KAHL-uh-jen): A family of fibrous proteins, collagens are the building blocks of skin, tendon, bone, and other connective tissues.
  • Proteoglycans (PRO-tee-uh-GLY-kanz): Made up of proteins and sugars, strands of proteoglycans interweave with collagens and form a mesh-like tissue. This allows cartilage to flex and absorb physical shock.
  • Chondrocytes (KAHN-druh-sytz): Found throughout the cartilage, chondrocytes are cells that produce cartilage and help it stay healthy as it grows. Sometimes, however, they release substances called enzymes that destroy collagen and other proteins. Researchers are trying to learn more about chondrocytes.

How Do You Know if You Have Osteoarthritis?

Usually, osteoarthritis comes on slowly. Early in the disease, your joints may ache after physical work or exercise. Later on, joint pain may become more persistent. You may also experience joint stiffness, particularly when you first wake up in the morning or have been in one position for a long time.

Although osteoarthritis can occur in any joint, most often it affects the hands, knees, hips, and spine (either at the neck or lower back). Different characteristics of the disease can depend on the specific joint(s) affected.  For information on the joints most often affected by osteoarthritis, see the following descriptions:

Hands: Osteoarthritis of the hands seems to have some hereditary characteristics; that is, it runs in families. If your mother or grandmother has or had osteoarthritis in their hands, you’re at greater-than-average risk of having it too. Women are more likely than men to have osteoarthritis in the hands. For most women, it develops after menopause.

When osteoarthritis involves the hands, small, bony knobs may appear on the end joints (those closest to the nails) of the fingers. They are called Heberden’s (HEBerr-denz) nodes. Similar knobs, called Bouchard’s (boo-SHARDZ) nodes, can appear on the middle joints of the fingers. Fingers can become enlarged and gnarled, and they may ache or be stiff and numb. The base of the thumb joint also is commonly affected by osteoarthritis.

Knees: The knees are among the joints most commonly affected by osteoarthritis. Symptoms of knee osteoarthritis include stiffness, swelling, and pain, which make it hard to walk, climb, and get in and out of chairs and bathtubs. Osteoarthritis in the knees can lead to disability.

Hips: The hips are also common sites of osteoarthritis. As with knee osteoarthritis, symptoms of hip osteoarthritis include pain and stiffness of the joint itself. But sometimes pain is felt in the groin, inner thigh, buttocks, or even the knees. Osteoarthritis of the hip may limit moving and bending, making daily activities such as dressing and putting on shoes a challenge.

Spine: Osteoarthritis of the spine may show up as stiffness and pain in the neck or lower back. In some cases, arthritis-related changes in the spine can cause pressure on the nerves where they exit the spinal column, resulting in weakness, tingling, or numbness of the arms and legs. In severe cases, this can even affect bladder and bowel function.

The Warning Signs of Osteoarthritis

  • Stiffness in a joint after getting out of bed or sitting for a long time
  • Swelling in one or more joints
  • Crunching feeling or the sound of bone rubbing on bone

About a third of people whose x rays show evidence of osteoarthritis report pain or other symptoms. For those who experience steady or intermittent pain, it is typically aggravated by activity and relieved by rest.

If you feel hot or your skin turns red, or if your joint pain is accompanied by other symptoms such as a rash or fevers, you probably do not have osteoarthritis. Check with your doctor about other causes, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Testimonials

Dr. Oz recommends the cryogenic chamber therapy on his show on January 20th, 2011

“IT HELPS! … You have less swelling…, less chemicals are released into the joint space, and less aches and pains overall. It also affects the nerves.”

Dr Georg Kettenhuber, treats world class athletes in his clinic in Austria

‘’Cold therapy has profound analgesic effects. I use it to treat sports injuries, inflammatory rheumatic diseases, degenerative diseases and all manner of chronic painful conditions… There are also huge psychological benefits. It can ease depression and insomnia, and has good effects on stress.’’

Jan Guest, Dallas, Texas

 “I have had seven sessions of Cryosauna cryotherapy and I can attest to a sharp increase in my energy. I also notice a difference in my sleep. Fatigue is not as pronounced as it was before.”

 Help For Health Customer, Angie K.

I spoke to Kathi and began to ask about the different services they offered. She told me about Cryosauna cryotherapy and the many benefits of cold therapy. {Cryotherapy is localized or wholebody exposure to subzero temperatures to decrease inflammation, increase cellular survival, decrease pain and spasms, and promote overall health.}
My first reaction was there is no possible way I can get into a cylinder and purposely freeze myself as a means of weight loss, however there is very little I would not try to be pain free.
I had my first session that same day-Best Decision EVER!!!
The Service:
There were several things that made me anxious at that first session #1 How cold is it really going to be #2 Can I make it thru the entire time #3 NAKED??!! My mind was definitely getting the better of me. Armed with my socks, gloves and robe i stepped into the service that changed my life. At first it was overwhelming to have the blasts of cold against my exposed skin but Kathi was there to
keep me focused and motivated. She counted down the time in intervals, and became my personal cheerleader reminding me to focus and I could do it. Before I knew Kathi said “10
seconds, I’m getting your robe ready.” That robe is my favorite part, It is so warm and perfect. As soon as I stepped out both of my ankles and my knees cracked releasing the tension that
had been there for months. I raised my arms and my entire upper back, neck and jaw released. It was amazing. Chiro 3 days a week, for over a year, did not give me that. The Next few days I started to notice other things, my skin was bright and clear. I was able to sleep better. I was going to the bathroom constantly( As an IBS sufferer this was not normal) I had more energy. I felt good, really good.  I went back and told Kathi about my experience and purchased a package. Each time I have the service my injuries, my health, everything improves. This service has done more for me than 5 years of therapy combined.
If I hear anyone talk about an injury or pain they may have, I immediately tell them about Cryotherapy. I am truly blessed to have found Help for Health. The staff is amazing, They are friendly, and engaging. They make me feel welcome, at home and I truly enjoy seeing their smiling faces. -Angie K.

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Learn Nore About How Cryosauna Cryotherapy Can Help You – Make Another Selection Below

A testimonial with many aspects, sleep, arthritis, pain, weight and cellulite loss, stress and mental clarity

The following testimonial contains so many beneficial aspects that we thought should be included as a reference article: “This is something I must share. I purchased a Groupon for cryotherapy after seeing it on several television shows and then I researched its benefits online. When I saw it has helped other people who had arthritis

Posted in Cryosaun-Beauty, Cryosauna – Whole Body, Cryosauna Weight Loss, cryosauna-Pain, Cryosauna-Pain, Cryosauna-Stress, Depression-Anxiety, Happiness, Healing, Help For Health News, wellness | Comments Off on A testimonial with many aspects, sleep, arthritis, pain, weight and cellulite loss, stress and mental clarity

Whole-body cryotherapy in patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease. A prospective study

[Article in German] Braun KP1, Brookman-Amissah S, Geissler K, Ast D, May M, Ernst H. Author information 1Praxis für Allgemeinmedizin (Inhaber: MR Dr. H.-P. Braun), Albert-Schweitzer-Strasse 11, 03050 Cottbus. kay-p.braun@web.de Abstract BACKGROUND: As yet, whole-body cryotherapy is especially used for the therapy of chronic inflammatory arthritis. An analgetic effect has been described in several studies.

Posted in Auto-Immune, Cryosauna- auto immune, cryosauna-Pain, Cryosauna-Pain, Disease Resistance | Comments Off on Whole-body cryotherapy in patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease. A prospective study

Cryotherapy not just for Cavaliers

By Jen Picciano BEREA, OH (WOIO) – LeBron James uses it, and claims cryotherapy helps players heal faster. The Cavs practice facility even has its own cryo sauna now. But non-athletes can benefit from using it, as well. Cryotherapy is helping weekend warriors and professional athletes alike, heal faster. “It’ll cut muscle recovery time down to 72

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Channel 9 Airs Cryosauna Session at Help For Health, May 26, 2015

  On May 28. 2015, Channel 9 News aired a Health Alert interview featuring the Cryosauna Therapy available at Help For Health, Vienna VA. It featured the benefits of Cryosauna Therapy afforded a Help For Health client, Terry Doyle. Terry, a hairdresser for over 30 years, began been experiencing arthritis and tendonitis, in her elbow

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Studies on Whole-body Cryotherapy

WHOLE-BODY CRYOTHERAPY IN INFLAMMATORY AND NON-INFLAMMATORY RHEUMATIC DISEASES KARGUS, K.BLUM, T. TÄUBER, J. TEUBER, BAYREUTH   Since 1999, our clinic is equipped with a whole-body cryochamber which is used to combat rheumatic disorders. The cryochamber design is a two-chamber system consisting of an antechamber with a temperature of approx. -60°C and a main chamber with

Posted in Auto-Immune, Cryosauna – Whole Body, Cryosauna- auto immune, cryosauna-Pain, Cryosauna-Pain, Disease Resistance | Comments Off on Studies on Whole-body Cryotherapy

CRYOGENIC PHYSICAL THERAPY

Cryogenic physiotherapy— medical and generally therapeutic procedure based oil the short-term contact of the skin stuface with the gas cooled to the temperature of -IS0°C to -120° C. The duration of the contact is considerably important. Since the skin surface has to be cooled to the temperature low than 0° C (32° F) for at

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Time-Course of Changes in Inflammatory Response after Whole-Body Cryotherapy Multi Exposures following Severe Exercise

Herve Pournot, Franc ̧ois Bieuzen, Julien Louis, Jean-Robert Fillard, Etienne Barbiche, Christophe Hausswirth   Research Department, National Institute of Sport, Expertise and Performance (INSEP), Paris, France,   Laboratory of Physiological Adaptations, Motor Performance and Health (EA 3837), Faculty of Sport Sciences of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nice, France,   Medical Department, National Institute of Sport, Expertise and

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Preliminary Overview: Clinical Relevance of Whole Body Cryotherapy

Author: Alan G. Christianson, NMD Abstract Whole Body Cryotherapy (WBC) is a hypothermic application designed to reduce musculoskeletal pain and inflammation. WBC stimulates the sympathetic nervous system via alpha-adrenergic receptors, causing dramatic peripheral vasoconstriction. This induces adaptive changes correlating with effects of analgesia, reduction of inflammation, and increases in serum markers of tissue repair.  

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