Cryosauna Cryotherapy Helps with Depression and Anxiety

 

Many Americans suffer from depression

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Many Americans suffer from mental conditions such as depression and anxiety. Studies show these health problems and illnesses affect about 1 in 5 Americans. A tough situation such as a natural disaster, the loss of a loved one, or financial distress can trigger or increase depression and anxiety.

Do You Know the Signs?

Someone who is depressed has feelings of sadness or anxiety that last for weeks at a time. He or she may also experience:

  • Feelings of hopelessness and/or pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, and/or helplessness
  • Irritability, restlessness
  • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable
  • Fatigue and decreased energy
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering details, and making decisions
  • Insomnia, early-morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping
  • Overeating, or appetite loss
  • Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts
  • Persistent aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems that do not get better, even with treatment

From: http://www.cdc.gov/features/Depression/index.html

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Whole-body cryotherapy as adjunct treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders Joanna Rymaszewska, David Ramsey, and Sylwia Chładzińska-Kiejna Author information ► Article notes ► Copyright and License information ► This article has been cited by other articles in PMC (PubMed Central). Full Report at – http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2734249/ Abstract Introduction: Rheumatism has been treated using whole-body cryotherapy (WBCT)

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Whole body cryotherapy as a novel adjuvant therapy for depression and anxiety

Author: Joanna Rymaszewska David Ramsey Summary Aim. The whole body cryotherapy (WBCT) is becoming a more popular adjuvant method in rehabilitation and renewal. The objective was to evaluate influence of WBCT on depressive and anxiety symptoms. Materials and methods. The study group (n=26) was treated using a series of 15 daily visits to a cryogenic

Posted in Depression-Anxiety | Comments Off on Whole body cryotherapy as a novel adjuvant therapy for depression and anxiety

 

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Recent Studies Show that the Cryosauna Cryotherapy May Be an Effective Treatment for Depression

People who suffer from depression or anxiety should seek help as early as possible. A recent study was conducted to evaluate influence of Whole Body Cryotherapy (WBCT) on depressive and anxiety symptoms. Materials and methods: The study group (n=26) was treated using a series of 15 daily visits to a cryogenic chamber (-110° to 160°C) which lasted 2-3 minutes each. A control (n=34) group was similar to the study group as concerning diagnoses (anxiety and depressive disorders), age

and gender. Both groups received standard out-patient psychopharmacotherapy. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale were used to evaluate the severity of symptoms before and after WBCT (3 weeks observation). The self-rating life satisfaction scale was used as well. Two efficacy measures were established: a significantly greater reduction of the scales’ scores and mean scores lower at the endpoint in the study group in comparison to the control group.
Results. Both efficacy criteria were fulfilled for the depression scale in 12 of the 16 HDRS items except gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms, hypochondria, body mass and criticism. Concerning the HARS scale, in 11 of 14 anxiety items (except gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms and behavior) the mean reduction was significantly bigger and the mean final status was better in the experimental group in comparison to the control one.As for the life satisfaction scale, efficacy was shown in 6 of the 11 items: physical and mental health, everyday activity, vocational activity, hobbies and general life satisfaction – in the experimental group.
Conclusion. These findings suggest a possible role for WBCT as a short-term adjuvant therapy for depressive and anxious patients.

Full Text at: http://media.wix.com/ugd/76b06d_31ce599f1c5f38ebd42a3290310d720c.pdf

What Is Depression?

From: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml

Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad. But these feelings are usually short-lived and pass within a couple of days. When you have depression, it interferes with daily life and causes pain for both you and those who care about you. Depression is a common but serious illness.

Many people with a depressive illness never seek treatment. But the majority, even those with the most severe depression, can get better with treatment. Medications, psychotherapies, and other methods can effectively treat people with depression.

There are several forms of depressive disorders.

Major depression,—severe symptoms that interfere with your ability to work, sleep, study, eat, and enjoy life. An episode can occur only once in a person’s lifetime, but more often, a person has several episodes.

Persistent depressive disorder—depressed mood that lasts for at least 2 years. A person diagnosed with persistent depressive disorder may have episodes of major depression along with periods of less severe symptoms, but symptoms must last for 2 years.

Some forms of depression are slightly different, or they may develop under unique circumstances. They include:

  • Psychotic depression, which occurs when a person has severe depression plus some form of psychosis, such as having disturbing false beliefs or a break with reality (delusions), or hearing or seeing upsetting things that others cannot hear or see (hallucinations).
  • Postpartum depression, which is much more serious than the “baby blues” that many women experience after giving birth, when hormonal and physical changes and the new responsibility of caring for a newborn can be overwhelming. It is estimated that 10 to 15 percent of women experience postpartum depression after giving birth.
  • Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which is characterized by the onset of depression during the winter months, when there is less natural sunlight. The depression generally lifts during spring and summer. SAD may be effectively treated with light therapy, but nearly half of those with SAD do not get better with light therapy alone. Antidepressant medication and psychotherapy can reduce SAD symptoms, either alone or in combination with light therapy.

Bipolar disorder, also called manic-depressive illness, is not as common as major depression or persistent depressive disorder. Bipolar disorder is characterized by cycling mood changes—from extreme highs (e.g., mania) to extreme lows (e.g., depression).

Causes

Most likely, depression is caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors.

Depressive illnesses are disorders of the brain. Brain-imaging technologies, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have shown that the brains of people who have depression look different than those of people without depression. The parts of the brain involved in mood, thinking, sleep, appetite, and behavior appear different. But these images do not reveal why the depression has occurred. They also cannot be used to diagnose depression.

Some types of depression tend to run in families. However, depression can occur in people without family histories of depression too. Scientists are studying certain genes that may make some people more prone to depression. Some genetics research indicates that risk for depression results from the influence of several genes acting together with environmental or other factors. In addition, trauma, loss of a loved one, a difficult relationship, or any stressful situation may trigger a depressive episode. Other depressive episodes may occur with or without an obvious trigger.

Signs and Symptoms,

“It was really hard to get out of bed in the morning. I just wanted to hide under the covers and not talk to anyone. I didn’t feel much like eating and I lost a lot of weight. Nothing seemed fun anymore. I was tired all the time, and I wasn’t sleeping well at night. But I knew I had to keep going because I’ve got kids and a job. It just felt so impossible, like nothing was going to change or get better.”

People with depressive illnesses do not all experience the same symptoms. The severity, frequency, and duration of symptoms vary depending on the individual and his or her particular illness.

Signs and symptoms include:

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” feelings
  • Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness
  • Irritability, restlessness
  • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable, including sex
  • Fatigue and decreased energy
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering details, and making decisions
  • Insomnia, early-morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping
  • Overeating, or appetite loss
  • Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts
  • Aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment.

Who Is At Risk?

Major depressive disorder is one of the most common mental disorders in the United States. Each year about 6.7% of U.S adults experience major depressive disorder. Women are 70 % more likely than men to experience depression during their lifetime.  Non-Hispanic blacks are 40% less likely than non-Hispanic whites to experience depression during their lifetime.  The average age of onset is 32 years old. Additionally, 3.3% of 13 to 18 year olds have experienced a seriously debilitating depressive disorder.

Diagnosis

“I started missing days from work, and a friend noticed that something wasn’t right. She talked to me about the time she had been really depressed and had gotten help from her doctor.”

Depression, even the most severe cases, can be effectively treated. The earlier that treatment can begin, the more effective it is.

The first step to getting appropriate treatment is to visit a doctor or mental health specialist. Certain medications, and some medical conditions such as viruses or a thyroid disorder, can cause the same symptoms as depression. A doctor can rule out these possibilities by doing a physical exam, interview, and lab tests. If the doctor can find no medical condition that may be causing the depression, the next step is a psychological evaluation.

The doctor may refer you to a mental health professional, who should discuss with you any family history of depression or other mental disorder, and get a complete history of your symptoms. You should discuss when your symptoms started, how long they have lasted, how severe they are, and whether they have occurred before and if so, how they were treated. The mental health professional may also ask if you are using alcohol or drugs, and if you are thinking about death or suicide.

Other illnesses may come on before depression, cause it, or be a consequence of it. But depression and other illnesses interact differently in different people. In any case, co-occurring illnesses need to be diagnosed and treated.

Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder, often accompany depression. PTSD can occur after a person experiences a terrifying event or ordeal, such as a violent assault, a natural disaster, an accident, terrorism or military combat. People experiencing PTSD are especially prone to having co-existing depression.

Alcohol and other substance abuse or dependence may also co-exist with depression. Research shows that mood disorders and substance abuse commonly occur together.

Depression also may occur with other serious medical illnesses such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, HIV/AIDS, diabetes, and Parkinson’s disease. People who have depression along with another medical illness tend to have more severe symptoms of both depression and the medical illness, more difficulty adapting to their medical condition, and more medical costs than those who do not have co-existing depression. Treating the depression can also help improve the outcome of treating the co-occurring illness.

 

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