Lymph Drainage: What is it and how

can it help you?

 

 

Contents of This Page

Lymph-Drainage-290x300

 

About This Service

 

 

Service Price

Call 703-644-4325 for the latest available pricing package.

 

Schedules

 

Preparing for Treatment

 

 

We have the best prices in the business

Lymph Drainage Articles- General

The focus is Lymph Drainage Fairfax VA, Lymph Drainage Vienna VA, Lymph Drainage Falls Church VA, Lymph Drainage Alexandria VA, Lymph Drainage Mclean VA, Lymph Drainage Annandale VA, Lymph Drainage Springfield VA.

Please feel free to search our site for natural remedies

 

Structural and functional features of central nervous system lymphatic vessels

https://lymphaticnetwork.org/treating-lymphedema/latest-research One of the characteristics of the central nervous system is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage system. Although it is now accepted that the central nervous system undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment1, 2, 3, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the central […]

Posted in lymph | Tagged , | Comments Off on Structural and functional features of central nervous system lymphatic vessels | Edit

How to optimize your detoxification system

Here is a very informative article by Dr. Mark Hyman, MD, on detoxification. You may also consult with Kathi at Help For Health if you have detoxification issues: The role of toxins and detoxification in health has been largely ignored by medicine. But thankfully scientists and practitioners are starting to recognize its importance in health. […]

Posted in Colon Hydrotherapy, Depression-Anxiety, Detoxification, Fitness, Happiness, Healing, Help For Health News, lymph, Medical, Sauna, wellness | Comments Off on How to optimize your detoxification system | Edit

Lymphatic drainage

Lymphatic drainage Synopsis:David HelwigLaurie Fundukian Source Citation: “Lymphatic drainage.” David Helwig. The Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine. Ed. Laurie Fundukian. 3rd ed. Detroit: Gale, 2009. 4 vols. Definition Lymphatic drainage is a therapeutic method that uses massage-like manipulations to stimulate lymph movement. Lymph is the plasma-like fluid that maintains the body’s fluid balance and removes […]

Posted in lymph | Comments Off on Lymphatic drainage | Edit

 

Lymph Drainage Articles- Autoimmune

The focus is Autoimmune Fairfax VA, Autoimmune Vienna VA, Autoimmune Falls Church VA, Autoimmune Alexandria VA, Autoimmune Mclean VA, Autoimmune Annandale VA, Autoimmune Springfield VA.

Do Not Feed Your Child Infant Soy Formula

Story at-a-glance Breast milk is an ideal food for infants. Ideally, breast-feed your child for at least six months or longer. If unable to breast-feed, making your own homemade formula is your healthiest option Most commercial infant formulas are very high in processed sugar and other questionable ingredients. Soy formulas are among the most dangerous […]

Posted in Auto-Immune, Help For Health News, wellness | Comments Off on Do Not Feed Your Child Infant Soy Formula | Edit

Styrofoam Really Is Bad for Your Health

My niece is a college student, and forget about the healthy snacks that my sister once plied her with — frozen blueberries, raw carrots and peppers, Greek yogurt. Now she and her roommates subsist on salty soups in Styrofoam containers that they heat in the communal microwave. This, too, will pass, I know, but a […]

Posted in Auto-Immune, Detoxification, Fitness, Help For Health News, wellness | Comments Off on Styrofoam Really Is Bad for Your Health | Edit

Safe Cosmetics

Here is a timely article, from the Breast Cancer Action website, on how to avoid cancer-causing cosmetics. For more details go to http://www.bcaction.org/our-take-on-breast-cancer/environment/safe-cosmetics/ Because testing is voluntary and controlled by the cosmetic manufacturers, many ingredients in cosmetic products are not tested for safety. The Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep states that 89 percent of ingredients […]

Posted in Auto-Immune, Detoxification, Healing, Help For Health News, Medical, wellness | Comments Off on Safe Cosmetics | Edit

Bromines: Avoid This if You Want to Keep Your Thyroid Healthy

Bromides are a common endocrine disruptor. Because bromide is also a halide, it competes for the same receptors that are used in the thyroid gland (among other places) to capture iodine. This will inhibit thyroid hormone production resulting in a low thyroid state. Source: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/09/05/another-poison-hiding-in-your-environment.aspx Iodine is essential for your body, and is detected in […]

Posted in Auto-Immune, Detoxification, Fitness, Healing, Help For Health News, Medical, wellness | Comments Off on Bromines: Avoid This if You Want to Keep Your Thyroid Healthy | Edit

Processed meats do cause cancer – WHO

26 October 2015 Processed meats – such as bacon, sausages and ham – do cause cancer, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Its report said 50g of processed meat a day – less than two slices of bacon – increased the chance of developing colorectal cancer by 18%. Meanwhile, it said red meats were […]

Posted in Auto-Immune, Detoxification, Healing, Help For Health News, Medical, wellness | Comments Off on Processed meats do cause cancer – WHO | Edit

Whole-body cryotherapy in patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease. A prospective study

[Article in German] Braun KP1, Brookman-Amissah S, Geissler K, Ast D, May M, Ernst H. Author information 1Praxis für Allgemeinmedizin (Inhaber: MR Dr. H.-P. Braun), Albert-Schweitzer-Strasse 11, 03050 Cottbus. kay-p.braun@web.de Abstract BACKGROUND: As yet, whole-body cryotherapy is especially used for the therapy of chronic inflammatory arthritis. An analgetic effect has been described in several studies. […]

Posted in Auto-Immune, Cryosauna- auto immune, cryosauna-Pain, Cryosauna-Pain, Disease Resistance | Comments Off on Whole-body cryotherapy in patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease. A prospective study | Edit

Cryotherapy not just for Cavaliers

By Jen Picciano BEREA, OH (WOIO) – LeBron James uses it, and claims cryotherapy helps players heal faster. The Cavs practice facility even has its own cryo sauna now. But non-athletes can benefit from using it, as well. Cryotherapy is helping weekend warriors and professional athletes alike, heal faster. “It’ll cut muscle recovery time down to 72 […]

Posted in Auto-Immune, Cryosaun-Beauty, Cryosauna – Whole Body, Cryosauna- auto immune, cryosauna-Pain, Cryosauna-Pain, Cryosauna-Sports, Depression-Anxiety, Sports Performance | Comments Off on Cryotherapy not just for Cavaliers | Edit

Channel 9 Airs Cryosauna Session at Help For Health, May 26, 2015

  On May 28. 2015, Channel 9 News aired a Health Alert interview featuring the Cryosauna Therapy available at Help For Health, Vienna VA. It featured the benefits of Cryosauna Therapy afforded a Help For Health client, Terry Doyle. Terry, a hairdresser for over 30 years, began been experiencing arthritis and tendonitis, in her elbow […]

Posted in Auto-Immune, Cryosaun-Beauty, Cryosauna – Whole Body, Cryosauna- auto immune, cryosauna-Pain, Cryosauna-Pain, Cryosauna-Sports, Depression-Anxiety, Help For Health News, Sports Performance | Comments Off on Channel 9 Airs Cryosauna Session at Help For Health, May 26, 2015 | Edit

Studies on Whole-body Cryotherapy

WHOLE-BODY CRYOTHERAPY IN INFLAMMATORY AND NON-INFLAMMATORY RHEUMATIC DISEASES KARGUS, K.BLUM, T. TÄUBER, J. TEUBER, BAYREUTH   Since 1999, our clinic is equipped with a whole-body cryochamber which is used to combat rheumatic disorders. The cryochamber design is a two-chamber system consisting of an antechamber with a temperature of approx. -60°C and a main chamber with […]

Posted in Auto-Immune, Cryosauna – Whole Body, Cryosauna- auto immune, cryosauna-Pain, Cryosauna-Pain, Disease Resistance | Comments Off on Studies on Whole-body Cryotherapy | Edit

CRYOGENIC PHYSICAL THERAPY

Cryogenic physiotherapy— medical and generally therapeutic procedure based oil the short-term contact of the skin stuface with the gas cooled to the temperature of -IS0°C to -120° C. The duration of the contact is considerably important. Since the skin surface has to be cooled to the temperature low than 0° C (32° F) for at […]

Posted in Auto-Immune, Cryosaun-Beauty, Cryosauna – Whole Body, Cryosauna- auto immune, cryosauna-Pain, Cryosauna-Pain, Cryosauna-Sports, Disease Resistance, Sports Performance | Comments Off on CRYOGENIC PHYSICAL THERAPY | Edit

 

 

 

The Best Lymph Drainage Treatment in Fairfax VA and How It Can Benefit You

Help For Health offers the Best Lymph Drainage Treatment in Fairfax VA.  Compare us.  We offer free Wifi, free shower and free ozone water.  Also compare our services to those in Vienna, Mclean, Falls Church, Alexandria, Annandale , Springfield, Washington, DC, and other cities nearby.

About the Lymph Drainage Treatment

Your lymph system is your immune system. It is a complicated vessels, ducts, and nodes that flush themselves to cleanse your tissues. This periodic flushing promotes cellular repair, and eliminates toxins. Conditions that cause you to experience sluggish lymph flow, can lead to congestion, weight gain, diminished radiance, premature aging, skin breakouts, facial edema, dark circles, dry, wrinkled or sallow looking skin, spider veins, and cellulite.

Introduction to the Lymphatic System

From: http://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/lymphatic/

The lymphatic system has three primary functions. First of all, it returns excess interstitial fluid to the blood. Of the fluid that leaves the capillary, about 90 percent is returned. The 10 percent that does not return becomes part of the interstitial fluid that surrounds the tissue cells. Small protein molecules may “leak” through the capillary wall and increase the osmotic pressure of the interstitial fluid. This further inhibits the return of fluid into the capillaries, and fluid tends to accumulate in the tissue spaces. If this continues, blood volume and blood pressure decrease significantly and the volume of tissue fluid increases, which results in edema (swelling). Lymph capillaries pick up the excess interstitial fluid and proteins and return them to the venous blood. After the fluid enters the lymph capillaries, it is called lymph.

The second function of the lymphatic system is the absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins from the digestive system and the subsequent transport of these substances to the venous circulation. The mucosa that lines the small intestine is covered with fingerlike projections called villi. There are blood capillaries and special lymph capillaries, called lacteals, in the center of each villus. The blood capillaries absorb most nutrients, but the fats and fat-soluble vitamins are absorbed by the lacteals. The lymph in the lacteals has a milky appearance due to its high fat content and is called chyle.

The third and probably most well known function of the lymphatic system is defense against invading microorganisms and disease. Lymph nodes and other lymphatic organs filter the lymph to remove microorganisms and other foreign particles. Lymphatic organs contain lymphocytes that destroy invading organisms.

Components of the Lymphatic System

The lymphatic system consists of a fluid (lymph), vessels that transport the lymph, and organs that contain lymphoid tissue.

Lymph

Lymph is a fluid similar in composition to blood plasma. It is derived from blood plasma as fluids pass through capillary walls at the arterial end. As the interstitial fluid begins to accumulate, it is picked up and removed by tiny lymphatic vessels and returned to the blood. As soon as the interstitial fluid enters the lymph capillaries, it is called lymph. Returning the fluid to the blood prevents edema and helps to maintain normal blood volume and pressure.

Lymphatic Vessels

Lymphatic vessels, unlike blood vessels, only carry fluid away from the tissues. The smallest lymphatic vessels are the lymph capillaries, which begin in the tissue spaces as blind-ended sacs. Lymph capillaries are found in all regions of the body except the bone marrow, central nervous system, and tissues, such as the epidermis, that lack blood vessels. The wall of the lymph capillary is composed of endothelium in which the simple squamous cells overlap to form a simple one-way valve. This arrangement permits fluid to enter the capillary but prevents lymph from leaving the vessel.

Illustration of lymphatic capillaries in the tissue spaces

The microscopic lymph capillaries merge to form lymphatic vessels. Small lymphatic vessels join to form larger tributaries, called lymphatic trunks, which drain large regions. Lymphatic trunks merge until the lymph enters the two lymphatic ducts. The right lymphatic duct drains lymph from the upper right quadrant of the body. The thoracic duct drains all the rest.

Like veins, the lymphatic tributaries have thin walls and have valves to prevent backflow of blood. There is no pump in the lymphatic system like the heart in the cardiovascular system. The pressure gradients to move lymph through the vessels come from the skeletal muscle action, respiratory movement, and contraction of smooth muscle in vessel walls.

Lymphatic Organs

Lymphatic organs are characterized by clusters of lymphocytes and other cells, such as macrophages, enmeshed in a framework of short, branching connective tissue fibers. The lymphocytes originate in the red bone marrow with other types of blood cells and are carried in the blood from the bone marrow to the lymphatic organs. When the body is exposed to microorganisms and other foreign substances, the lymphocytes proliferate within the lymphatic organs and are sent in the blood to the site of the invasion. This is part of the immune response that attempts to destroy the invading agent.

The lymphatic organs include:

  • Lymph Nodes
  • Tonsils
  • Spleen
  • Thymus

Lymph Nodes

Lymph nodes are small bean-shaped structures that are usually less than 2.5 cm in length. They are widely distributed throughout the body along the lymphatic pathways where they filter the lymph before it is returned to the blood. Lymph nodes are not present in the central nervous system. There are three superficial regions on each side of the body where lymph nodes tend to cluster. These areas are the inguinal nodes in the groin, the axillary nodes in the armpit, and the cervical nodes in the neck.

The typical lymph node is surrounded by a connective tissue capsule and divided into compartments called lymph nodules. The lymph nodules are dense masses of lymphocytes and macrophages and are separated by spaces called lymph sinuses. The afferent lymphatics enter the node at different parts of its periphery, which carry lymph into the node; entering the node on the convex side. The lymph moves through the lymph sinuses and enters an efferent lymphatic vessel, which, located at an indented region called the hilum, carries the lymph away from the node.

Illustration of the structure of a lymph node

Tonsils

Illustration of the mouth and the location of the tonsils

Tonsils are clusters of lymphatic tissue just under the mucous membranes that line the nose, mouth, and throat (pharynx). There are three groups of tonsils. The pharyngeal tonsils are located near the opening of the nasal cavity into the pharynx. When these tonsils become enlarged they may interfere with breathing and are called adenoids. The palatine tonsils are the ones that are located near the opening of the oral cavity into the pharynx. Lingual tonsils are located on the posterior surface of the tongue, which also places them near the opening of the oral cavity into the pharynx. Lymphocytes and macrophages in the tonsils provide protection against harmful substances and pathogens that may enter the body through the nose or mouth.

Spleen

Illustration of the spleen and its location in the human body

The spleen is located in the upper left abdominal cavity, just beneath the diaphragm, and posterior to the stomach. It is similar to a lymph node in shape and structure but it is much larger. The spleen is the largest lymphatic organ in the body. Surrounded by a connective tissue capsule, which extends inward to divide the organ into lobules, the spleen consists of two types of tissue called white pulp and red pulp. The white pulp is lymphatic tissue consisting mainly of lymphocytes around arteries. The red pulp consists of venous sinuses filled with blood and cords of lymphatic cells, such as lymphocytes and macrophages. Blood enters the spleen through the splenic artery, moves through the sinuses where it is filtered, then leaves through the splenic vein.

The spleen filters blood in much the way that the lymph nodes filter lymph. Lymphocytes in the spleen react to pathogens in the blood and attempt to destroy them. Macrophages then engulf the resulting debris, the damaged cells, and the other large particles. The spleen, along with the liver, removes old and damaged erythrocytes from the circulating blood. Like other lymphatic tissue, it produces lymphocytes, especially in response to invading pathogens. The sinuses in the spleen are a reservoir for blood. In emergencies such as hemorrhage, smooth muscle in the vessel walls and in the capsule of the spleen contracts. This squeezes the blood out of the spleen into the general circulation.

Thymus

Illustration of the thymus and its location in the human body

The thymus is a soft organ with two lobes that is located anterior to the ascending aorta and posterior to the sternum. It is relatively large in infants and children but after puberty it begins to decrease in size so that in older adults it is quite small.

The primary function of the thymus is the processing and maturation of special lymphocytes called T-lymphocytes or T-cells. While in the thymus, the lymphocytes do not respond to pathogens and foreign agents. After the lymphocytes have matured, they enter the blood and go to other lymphatic organs where they help provide defense against disease. The thymus also produces a hormone, thymosin, which stimulates the maturation of lymphocytes in other lymphatic organs.

Review: Introduction to the Lymphatic System

Here is what we have learned from Introduction to the Lymphatic System:

  • The lymphatic system returns excess interstitial fluid to the blood, absorbs fats and fat-soluble vitamins, and provides defense against disease.
  • Lymph is the fluid in the lymphatic vessels. It is picked up from the interstitial fluid and returned to the blood plasma.
  • Lymphatic vessels carry fluid away from the tissues.
  • The right lymphatic duct drains lymph from the upper right quadrant of the body and the thoracic duct drains all the rest.
  • Pressure gradients that move fluid through the lymphatic vessels come from the skeletal muscle action, respiratory movements, and contraction of smooth muscle in vessel walls.
  • Lymph enters a lymph node through afferent vessels, filters through the sinuses, and leaves through efferent vessels.
  • Tonsils are clusters of lymphatic tissue associated with openings into the pharynx and provide protection against pathogens that may enter through the nose and mouth.
  • The spleen is a lymph organ that filters blood and also acts as a reservoir for blood.
  • The thymus is large in the infant and atrophies after puberty.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Google Rank Checker